Discussion:
Destination z article: Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
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Gabe Goldberg
2018-10-08 01:11:26 UTC
Permalink
Ensuring Data Storage Longevity

Backup and Archival Data

Data comes in many varieties, related to why it exists and how it's
stored: active, warehouse, transactional, backup, archival and more.
I'll skip over the first three forms and focus on backup data (briefly)
and archival data (primarily).

Because backup data recovers from human error, equipment failures and
external catastrophes, its only reason for existing is restoring data to
a recent image. Archival data may be needed for legal or industry
compliance, historical recordkeeping, merger and acquisition due
diligence, unanticipated queries/searches, or reconstructing operational
environments. Backup data can be stored piecemeal as long as it can be
completely restored. Archival data is holistic, a complete/consistent
image. For a detailed explanation of why multiple backup copies—even
cloud storage—don't constitute archived data, see this Storage
Switzerland blog: https://bit.ly/2DzoJrR

http://destinationz.org/Mainframe-Solution/Trends/Ensuring-Data-Storage-Longevity
https://bit.ly/2NiJVSS

...for non-technical folk reading this (it's going to diverse lists) --
your data needs backup and archiving too. And backup still isn't archive.
--
Gabriel Goldberg, Computers and Publishing, Inc. ***@gabegold.com
3401 Silver Maple Place, Falls Church, VA 22042 (703) 204-0433
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/gabegold Twitter: GabeG0

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Jesse 1 Robinson
2018-10-08 16:47:50 UTC
Permalink
The distinction between backup and archive is useful. I'm not sure that '90 day usage' is the definitive boundary--we have scheduled year-end jobs that run only annually--but the categories make sense. However, it's not only about the data itself. Data is a structured mass of zeroes and ones that makes no sense at all without a means to render it intelligible.

Some time ago, we (IT) was asked to restore very old data needed by the Finance department. The data was years old, but as responsible corporate caretakers we found the tapes that contained the information requested. The kicker: it was IMS data, and IMS had been decommissioned here years earlier. Even if we could somehow wangle a temporary copy of IMS, the process of installing it was daunting as none of us had relevant experience. Moreover, there was no guarantee that a 'modern' version of IMS would be able to untangle ancient data formats. Finance eventually let us off the hook, but it was a lesson that still haunts us.

.
.
J.O.Skip Robinson
Southern California Edison Company
Electric Dragon Team Paddler
SHARE MVS Program Co-Manager
323-715-0595 Mobile
626-543-6132 Office ⇐=== NEW
***@sce.com


-----Original Message-----
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List [mailto:IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU] On Behalf Of Gabe Goldberg
Sent: Sunday, October 07, 2018 6:11 PM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: (External):Destination z article: Ensuring Data Storage Longevity

Ensuring Data Storage Longevity

Backup and Archival Data

Data comes in many varieties, related to why it exists and how it's
stored: active, warehouse, transactional, backup, archival and more.
I'll skip over the first three forms and focus on backup data (briefly) and archival data (primarily).

Because backup data recovers from human error, equipment failures and external catastrophes, its only reason for existing is restoring data to a recent image. Archival data may be needed for legal or industry compliance, historical recordkeeping, merger and acquisition due diligence, unanticipated queries/searches, or reconstructing operational environments. Backup data can be stored piecemeal as long as it can be completely restored. Archival data is holistic, a complete/consistent image. For a detailed explanation of why multiple backup copies—even cloud storage—don't constitute archived data, see this Storage Switzerland blog: https://bit.ly/2DzoJrR

http://destinationz.org/Mainframe-Solution/Trends/Ensuring-Data-Storage-Longevity
https://bit.ly/2NiJVSS

...for non-technical folk reading this (it's going to diverse lists) -- your data needs backup and archiving too. And backup still isn't archive.
--
Gabriel Goldberg, Computers and Publishing, Inc. ***@gabegold.com
3401 Silver Maple Place, Falls Church, VA 22042 (703) 204-0433
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/gabegold Twitter: GabeG0


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Steve Thompson
2018-10-08 17:22:12 UTC
Permalink
You have hit upon a checklist item when I am involved in a migration (especially from one O/S environment to another).

A sign off ensuring that management understands that should any archives be needed from the “old database”, the new system will not be able to read or process that data to produce any needed reports.

If they need that data it must be migrated to the new system’s format and tested to ensure the reports give the same answers as found on a prior printed/captured report (prior to the time the migration was started).

Steve Thompson

Sent from my iPhone — small keyboarf, fat fungrs, stupd spell manglr. Expct mistaks
Post by Jesse 1 Robinson
The distinction between backup and archive is useful. I'm not sure that '90 day usage' is the definitive boundary--we have scheduled year-end jobs that run only annually--but the categories make sense. However, it's not only about the data itself. Data is a structured mass of zeroes and ones that makes no sense at all without a means to render it intelligible.
Some time ago, we (IT) was asked to restore very old data needed by the Finance department. The data was years old, but as responsible corporate caretakers we found the tapes that contained the information requested. The kicker: it was IMS data, and IMS had been decommissioned here years earlier. Even if we could somehow wangle a temporary copy of IMS, the process of installing it was daunting as none of us had relevant experience. Moreover, there was no guarantee that a 'modern' version of IMS would be able to untangle ancient data formats. Finance eventually let us off the hook, but it was a lesson that still haunts us.
.
.
J.O.Skip Robinson
Southern California Edison Company
Electric Dragon Team Paddler
SHARE MVS Program Co-Manager
323-715-0595 Mobile
626-543-6132 Office ⇐=== NEW
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, October 07, 2018 6:11 PM
Subject: (External):Destination z article: Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
Backup and Archival Data
Data comes in many varieties, related to why it exists and how it's
stored: active, warehouse, transactional, backup, archival and more.
I'll skip over the first three forms and focus on backup data (briefly) and archival data (primarily).
Because backup data recovers from human error, equipment failures and external catastrophes, its only reason for existing is restoring data to a recent image. Archival data may be needed for legal or industry compliance, historical recordkeeping, merger and acquisition due diligence, unanticipated queries/searches, or reconstructing operational environments. Backup data can be stored piecemeal as long as it can be completely restored. Archival data is holistic, a complete/consistent image. For
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Mike Schwab
2018-10-08 19:02:09 UTC
Permalink
Or archive a detailed printout of the data to answer any questions.
Post by Steve Thompson
You have hit upon a checklist item when I am involved in a migration (especially from one O/S environment to another).
A sign off ensuring that management understands that should any archives be needed from the “old database”, the new system will not be able to read or process that data to produce any needed reports.
If they need that data it must be migrated to the new system’s format and tested to ensure the reports give the same answers as found on a prior printed/captured report (prior to the time the migration was started).
Steve Thompson
Sent from my iPhone — small keyboarf, fat fungrs, stupd spell manglr. Expct mistaks
Post by Jesse 1 Robinson
The distinction between backup and archive is useful. I'm not sure that '90 day usage' is the definitive boundary--we have scheduled year-end jobs that run only annually--but the categories make sense. However, it's not only about the data itself. Data is a structured mass of zeroes and ones that makes no sense at all without a means to render it intelligible.
Some time ago, we (IT) was asked to restore very old data needed by the Finance department. The data was years old, but as responsible corporate caretakers we found the tapes that contained the information requested. The kicker: it was IMS data, and IMS had been decommissioned here years earlier. Even if we could somehow wangle a temporary copy of IMS, the process of installing it was daunting as none of us had relevant experience. Moreover, there was no guarantee that a 'modern' version of IMS would be able to untangle ancient data formats. Finance eventually let us off the hook, but it was a lesson that still haunts us.
.
.
J.O.Skip Robinson
Southern California Edison Company
Electric Dragon Team Paddler
SHARE MVS Program Co-Manager
323-715-0595 Mobile
626-543-6132 Office ⇐=== NEW
-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, October 07, 2018 6:11 PM
Subject: (External):Destination z article: Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
Backup and Archival Data
Data comes in many varieties, related to why it exists and how it's
stored: active, warehouse, transactional, backup, archival and more.
I'll skip over the first three forms and focus on backup data (briefly) and archival data (primarily).
Because backup data recovers from human error, equipment failures and external catastrophes, its only reason for existing is restoring data to a recent image. Archival data may be needed for legal or industry compliance, historical recordkeeping, merger and acquisition due diligence, unanticipated queries/searches, or reconstructing operational environments. Backup data can be stored piecemeal as long as it can be completely restored. Archival data is holistic, a complete/consistent image. For
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--
Mike A Schwab, Springfield IL USA
Where do Forest Rangers go to get away from it all?

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Jerry Whitteridge
2018-10-08 17:35:58 UTC
Permalink
We also have been informed by our records retention team that we are NOT to
retain data past the legal retention period, even if the application
teams/business teams would like to do so. If the data exists, you would be
legally obliged to provide the data in the case of a legal dispute, if its
purged no issues arise.

Jerry Whitteridge
Delivery Manager / Mainframe Architect
GTS - Safeway Account
602 527 4871 Mobile
***@ibm.com

IBM Services
Date: 10/08/2018 09:48 AM
Subject: Re: Destination z article: Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
The distinction between backup and archive is useful. I'm not sure
that '90 day usage' is the definitive boundary--we have scheduled
year-end jobs that run only annually--but the categories make sense.
However, it's not only about the data itself. Data is a structured
mass of zeroes and ones that makes no sense at all without a means
to render it intelligible.
Some time ago, we (IT) was asked to restore very old data needed by
the Finance department. The data was years old, but as responsible
corporate caretakers we found the tapes that contained the
information requested. The kicker: it was IMS data, and IMS had been
decommissioned here years earlier. Even if we could somehow wangle a
temporary copy of IMS, the process of installing it was daunting as
none of us had relevant experience. Moreover, there was no guarantee
that a 'modern' version of IMS would be able to untangle ancient
data formats. Finance eventually let us off the hook, but it was a
lesson that still haunts us.
.
.
J.O.Skip Robinson
Southern California Edison Company
Electric Dragon Team Paddler
SHARE MVS Program Co-Manager
323-715-0595 Mobile
626-543-6132 Office ⇐=== NEW
-----Original Message-----
] On Behalf Of Gabe Goldberg
Sent: Sunday, October 07, 2018 6:11 PM
Subject: (External):Destination z article: Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
Ensuring Data Storage Longevity
Backup and Archival Data
Data comes in many varieties, related to why it exists and how it's
stored: active, warehouse, transactional, backup, archival and more.
I'll skip over the first three forms and focus on backup data
(briefly) and archival data (primarily).
Because backup data recovers from human error, equipment failures
and external catastrophes, its only reason for existing is restoring
data to a recent image. Archival data may be needed for legal or
industry compliance, historical recordkeeping, merger and
acquisition due diligence, unanticipated queries/searches, or
reconstructing operational environments. Backup data can be stored
piecemeal as long as it can be completely restored. Archival data is
holistic, a complete/consistent image. For a detailed explanation of
why multiple backup copies—even cloud storage—don't constitute
archived data, see this Storage Switzerland blog: https://
urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?
u=https-3A__bit.ly_2DzoJrR&d=DwIGaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-
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siA1ZOg&r=0avyVTgpzBFlo1QAgHxCtqKtRE6Ldl_1M9tI2p7Kc8E&m=n5vEqYyQJdgVV6l7F06AIBuPQxWwDhb8wjgqk1BME4Q&s=96iPf4sjy2kN0Twtd8ec7tTUcm9cGXm3IHdp8n8leTM&e=
INVALID URI REMOVED
u=https-3A__bit.ly_2NiJVSS&d=DwIGaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-
siA1ZOg&r=0avyVTgpzBFlo1QAgHxCtqKtRE6Ldl_1M9tI2p7Kc8E&m=n5vEqYyQJdgVV6l7F06AIBuPQxWwDhb8wjgqk1BME4Q&s=zl7GuQO8ctdbaBqQtx93EJOERBaBsHGgBEU2aksMinY&e=
...for non-technical folk reading this (it's going to diverse lists)
-- your data needs backup and archiving too. And backup still isn't
archive.
--
3401 Silver Maple Place, Falls Church, VA 22042 (703) 204-0433
LinkedIn: INVALID URI REMOVED
u=http-3A__www.linkedin.com_in_gabegold&d=DwIGaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-
siA1ZOg&r=0avyVTgpzBFlo1QAgHxCtqKtRE6Ldl_1M9tI2p7Kc8E&m=n5vEqYyQJdgVV6l7F06AIBuPQxWwDhb8wjgqk1BME4Q&s=OqDmH0BmTVL9r60Jckl6_jq60ERES5d8dP90xuJ2OqM&e=
Twitter: GabeG0
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