Discussion:
z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post
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Cheryl Watson
2017-07-27 00:45:15 UTC
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Here's my latest blog post from a techie's point of view. You might find
some things that haven't been mentioned yet.



http://watsonwalker.com/ibms-z14-zos-2-3-announcements/



Cheryl



Cheryl Watson

Watson & Walker, Inc.

www.watsonwalker.com <http://www.watsonwalker.com/>






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Jake Anderson
2017-07-27 07:03:32 UTC
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Hi

Apology for my ignorance

'Pauseless Garbage Collection' on Java

Could someone please explain on what Is meant by above sentence ?

Jake
Post by Cheryl Watson
Here's my latest blog post from a techie's point of view. You might find
some things that haven't been mentioned yet.
http://watsonwalker.com/ibms-z14-zos-2-3-announcements/
Cheryl
Cheryl Watson
Watson & Walker, Inc.
www.watsonwalker.com <http://www.watsonwalker.com/>
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David Crayford
2017-07-27 07:20:05 UTC
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Pause-less garbage collection is not new
http://www.artima.com/lejava/articles/azul_pauseless_gc.html. From
reading a previous post by Timothy Sipples it appears that IBM have
added some new hardware instructions to the z14 to assist with the
read/write barriers required to implement the algorithm.
Post by Jake Anderson
Hi
Apology for my ignorance
'Pauseless Garbage Collection' on Java
Could someone please explain on what Is meant by above sentence ?
Jake
Post by Cheryl Watson
Here's my latest blog post from a techie's point of view. You might find
some things that haven't been mentioned yet.
http://watsonwalker.com/ibms-z14-zos-2-3-announcements/
Cheryl
Cheryl Watson
Watson & Walker, Inc.
www.watsonwalker.com <http://www.watsonwalker.com/>
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Jake Anderson
2017-07-27 08:28:04 UTC
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Hi

Thanks.

So the pause less garbage collection reduces the CPU spike ? Sounds
interesting
Pause-less garbage collection is not new http://www.artima.com/lejava/a
rticles/azul_pauseless_gc.html. From reading a previous post by Timothy
Sipples it appears that IBM have added some new hardware instructions to
the z14 to assist with the read/write barriers required to implement the
algorithm.
Post by Jake Anderson
Hi
Apology for my ignorance
'Pauseless Garbage Collection' on Java
Could someone please explain on what Is meant by above sentence ?
Jake
Here's my latest blog post from a techie's point of view. You might find
Post by Cheryl Watson
some things that haven't been mentioned yet.
http://watsonwalker.com/ibms-z14-zos-2-3-announcements/
Cheryl
Cheryl Watson
Watson & Walker, Inc.
www.watsonwalker.com <http://www.watsonwalker.com/>
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Tony Harminc
2017-07-27 16:40:02 UTC
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Post by Jake Anderson
So the pause less garbage collection reduces the CPU spike ? Sounds
interesting
It's not so much about the CPU spike; it's mostly about all the real
Java work not having to wait while the GC is performed. It could even
take more CPU time under some circumstances for all I know.

Tony H.

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Parwez Hamid
2017-07-27 09:06:54 UTC
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High Level Summary for Garbage Collection:

Guarded Storage Facility (GSF)

Also known as less-pausing garbage collection, Guarded Storage Facility is a new
architecture introduced with z14 to enable enterprise scale Java applications to run without
periodic pause for garbage collection on larger heaps.

z/OS

GSF support allows an area of storage to be identified such that an Exit routine gets control if
a reference is made to that storage. GSF is managed by new instructions that define Guarded
Storage Controls and system code to maintain that control information across un-dispatch
and re-dispatch. Enabling a less-pausing approach improves Java garbage collection.
Function is provided on z14 running z/OS 2.2 and later with APAR OA51643 installed.
MACHMIG statement in LOADxx of SYS1.PARMLIB provides ability to disable the function.

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David Crayford
2017-07-27 11:17:06 UTC
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That's awesome! I would love to see some bench-tests to see how much it
improves performance. I've been coding quite a bit of Java recently and
have grown to like it.
Post by Parwez Hamid
Guarded Storage Facility (GSF)
Also known as less-pausing garbage collection, Guarded Storage Facility is a new
architecture introduced with z14 to enable enterprise scale Java applications to run without
periodic pause for garbage collection on larger heaps.
z/OS
GSF support allows an area of storage to be identified such that an Exit routine gets control if
a reference is made to that storage. GSF is managed by new instructions that define Guarded
Storage Controls and system code to maintain that control information across un-dispatch
and re-dispatch. Enabling a less-pausing approach improves Java garbage collection.
Function is provided on z14 running z/OS 2.2 and later with APAR OA51643 installed.
MACHMIG statement in LOADxx of SYS1.PARMLIB provides ability to disable the function.
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Paul Gilmartin
2017-07-27 14:04:08 UTC
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Post by Jake Anderson
So the pause less garbage collection reduces the CPU spike ? Sounds
interesting
Well, it distributes it, barring some major hardware assist.
Post by Jake Anderson
Post by Cheryl Watson
Here's my latest blog post from a techie's point of view. You might find
Post by Cheryl Watson
some things that haven't been mentioned yet.
http://watsonwalker.com/ibms-z14-zos-2-3-announcements/
... Some other statements of direction (SOD) include: stabilization of DFS/SMB
because NFS is the strategic file sharing protocol; ...

Does Windows support NFS client?

Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets (e.g. PDSE to ISPF LM services)?

How do 8-character user IDs play with the TSO OUTPUT command?
Post by Jake Anderson
Post by Cheryl Watson
Post by Cheryl Watson
Cheryl Watson
Watson & Walker, Inc.
www.watsonwalker.com <http://www.watsonwalker.com/>
-- gil

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David Crayford
2017-07-28 03:50:41 UTC
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Post by Paul Gilmartin
Post by Jake Anderson
So the pause less garbage collection reduces the CPU spike ? Sounds
interesting
Well, it distributes it, barring some major hardware assist.
Post by Jake Anderson
Post by Cheryl Watson
Here's my latest blog post from a techie's point of view. You might find
Post by Cheryl Watson
some things that haven't been mentioned yet.
http://watsonwalker.com/ibms-z14-zos-2-3-announcements/
... Some other statements of direction (SOD) include: stabilization of DFS/SMB
because NFS is the strategic file sharing protocol; ...
Does Windows support NFS client?
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoops https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets (e.g. PDSE to ISPF LM services)?
How do 8-character user IDs play with the TSO OUTPUT command?
Post by Jake Anderson
Post by Cheryl Watson
Post by Cheryl Watson
Cheryl Watson
Watson & Walker, Inc.
www.watsonwalker.com <http://www.watsonwalker.com/>
-- gil
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Dave Jones
2017-07-27 14:23:08 UTC
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Speaking of new hardware instructions, do we know when the new edition of the z/Architecture Principles of Operation will be available?
Thanks.
DJ

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Parwez Hamid
2017-07-27 14:42:52 UTC
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Availability of POPs. This tends to be at the same time when the system GAs.

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Dave Jones
2017-07-27 15:04:49 UTC
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So around the end of September, then. as "the general availability of the 3096-z14 on September 13, 2017".

DJ

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Timothy Sipples
2017-07-28 08:02:33 UTC
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Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does Windows support NFS client?
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoops https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
All supported desktop and server releases of Microsoft Windows include NFS
support. See here for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
instructions, for example:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx

macOS, IBM i, Linux, and all UNIX variants that I can think of also include
NFS support. It's quite a popular protocol, more popular than SMB/CIFS.
There's even a free NFS client for PC-DOS/MS-DOS/FreeDOS/DR-DOS operating
systems (would you believe):

http://freedos.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/NFS

It's probably past time to phase out the SMB protocol given recent
vulnerabilities and attacks such as WannaCry and ExPetr that affected
Windows systems. And if you decide to use file sharing of any sort, please
adopt and maintain security best practices if you haven't already.

Going forward, if you absolutely must have SMB protocol connectivity, then
"leapfrogging" is technically possible, I believe. The best leapfrogging
approach would be to configure Linux on Z such that z/OS connects via NFS
to Linux, thence Linux (using Samba) connects via SMB. In other words,
Linux on Z acts as a file/directory resharing gateway. I don't recommend
leapfrogging, but technically it should work. Variations are possible with
zdsfs instead of NFS for certain use cases.
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets
(e.g. PDSE to ISPF LM services)?
Yes, if I understand your "e.g." correctly. Here's the z/OS 2.2 NFS Guide
and Reference (direct link, subject to change) if you'd like the full
details:

http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/epubs/pdf/cpn2co11.pdf

To future readers: if this link is broken or not applicable (because you're
running a newer z/OS release for example), try searching for IBM
Publication SC23-6883 (latest revision), or check the z/OS part of the IBM
Knowledge Center.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Timothy Sipples
IT Architect Executive, Industry Solutions, IBM z Systems, AP/GCG/MEA
E-Mail: ***@sg.ibm.com

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David Crayford
2017-07-28 14:02:50 UTC
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Post by Timothy Sipples
Post by David Crayford
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoopshttps://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
All supported desktop and server releases of Microsoft Windows include NFS
support. See here for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx
I'm not sure about that for Windows desktop OSs. AFAIK it's only
recently been a feature of Windows 10 since Windows 10 Pro (Version
10.0.14393 and above) as mentioned in the blog.

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Frank Swarbrick
2017-07-28 18:12:47 UTC
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What is the likelihood of Microsoft phasing out a protocol they invented (SMB) in favor of one they id not (NFS)?

________________________________
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List <IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU> on behalf of Timothy Sipples <***@SG.IBM.COM>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:03 AM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does Windows support NFS client?
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoops https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
[Loading Image...]<https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/>

How to Mount an NFS Share Using a Windows 10 Machine<https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/>
graspingtech.com
Mounting an NFS (Network File System) share using a Unix-like operating system is pretty straight forward. But how do you do this in Windows 10?



All supported desktop and server releases of Microsoft Windows include NFS
support. See here for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
instructions, for example:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx
Starting Client for NFS - technet.microsoft.com<https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx>
technet.microsoft.com
To start Client for NFS from the Windows interface Open Services for Network File System: click Start, point to Programs or All Programs, point to Administrative ...



macOS, IBM i, Linux, and all UNIX variants that I can think of also include
NFS support. It's quite a popular protocol, more popular than SMB/CIFS.
There's even a free NFS client for PC-DOS/MS-DOS/FreeDOS/DR-DOS operating
systems (would you believe):

http://freedos.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/NFS

It's probably past time to phase out the SMB protocol given recent
vulnerabilities and attacks such as WannaCry and ExPetr that affected
Windows systems. And if you decide to use file sharing of any sort, please
adopt and maintain security best practices if you haven't already.

Going forward, if you absolutely must have SMB protocol connectivity, then
"leapfrogging" is technically possible, I believe. The best leapfrogging
approach would be to configure Linux on Z such that z/OS connects via NFS
to Linux, thence Linux (using Samba) connects via SMB. In other words,
Linux on Z acts as a file/directory resharing gateway. I don't recommend
leapfrogging, but technically it should work. Variations are possible with
zdsfs instead of NFS for certain use cases.
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets
(e.g. PDSE to ISPF LM services)?
Yes, if I understand your "e.g." correctly. Here's the z/OS 2.2 NFS Guide
and Reference (direct link, subject to change) if you'd like the full
details:

http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/epubs/pdf/cpn2co11.pdf

To future readers: if this link is broken or not applicable (because you're
running a newer z/OS release for example), try searching for IBM
Publication SC23-6883 (latest revision), or check the z/OS part of the IBM
Knowledge Center.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Timothy Sipples
IT Architect Executive, Industry Solutions, IBM z Systems, AP/GCG/MEA
E-Mail: ***@sg.ibm.com

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Farley, Peter x23353
2017-07-28 18:16:08 UTC
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Then again who would have expected M$ to support native Ubuntu Linux command line code running under Windows, but they did, and it works really well.

Sometimes they surprise you.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List [mailto:IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU] On Behalf Of Frank Swarbrick
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:14 PM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post

What is the likelihood of Microsoft phasing out a protocol they invented (SMB) in favor of one they id not (NFS)?

________________________________
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List <IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU> on behalf of Timothy Sipples <***@SG.IBM.COM>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:03 AM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does Windows support NFS client?
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoops https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
[https://graspingtech.com/wp-content/uploads/windows-10-logo.jpg]<https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/>

How to Mount an NFS Share Using a Windows 10 Machine<https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/>
graspingtech.com
Mounting an NFS (Network File System) share using a Unix-like operating system is pretty straight forward. But how do you do this in Windows 10?



All supported desktop and server releases of Microsoft Windows include NFS
support. See here for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
instructions, for example:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx
Starting Client for NFS - technet.microsoft.com<https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx>
technet.microsoft.com
To start Client for NFS from the Windows interface Open Services for Network File System: click Start, point to Programs or All Programs, point to Administrative ...



macOS, IBM i, Linux, and all UNIX variants that I can think of also include
NFS support. It's quite a popular protocol, more popular than SMB/CIFS.
There's even a free NFS client for PC-DOS/MS-DOS/FreeDOS/DR-DOS operating
systems (would you believe):

http://freedos.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/NFS

It's probably past time to phase out the SMB protocol given recent
vulnerabilities and attacks such as WannaCry and ExPetr that affected
Windows systems. And if you decide to use file sharing of any sort, please
adopt and maintain security best practices if you haven't already.

Going forward, if you absolutely must have SMB protocol connectivity, then
"leapfrogging" is technically possible, I believe. The best leapfrogging
approach would be to configure Linux on Z such that z/OS connects via NFS
to Linux, thence Linux (using Samba) connects via SMB. In other words,
Linux on Z acts as a file/directory resharing gateway. I don't recommend
leapfrogging, but technically it should work. Variations are possible with
zdsfs instead of NFS for certain use cases.
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets
(e.g. PDSE to ISPF LM services)?
Yes, if I understand your "e.g." correctly. Here's the z/OS 2.2 NFS Guide
and Reference (direct link, subject to change) if you'd like the full
details:

http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/epubs/pdf/cpn2co11.pdf

To future readers: if this link is broken or not applicable (because you're
running a newer z/OS release for example), try searching for IBM
Publication SC23-6883 (latest revision), or check the z/OS part of the IBM
Knowledge Center.

--

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Frank Swarbrick
2017-07-28 18:56:15 UTC
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True enough. Quite a cool feature that is, as well!

________________________________
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List <IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU> on behalf of Farley, Peter x23353 <***@BROADRIDGE.COM>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 12:16 PM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post

Then again who would have expected M$ to support native Ubuntu Linux command line code running under Windows, but they did, and it works really well.

Sometimes they surprise you.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List [mailto:IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU] On Behalf Of Frank Swarbrick
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:14 PM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post

What is the likelihood of Microsoft phasing out a protocol they invented (SMB) in favor of one they id not (NFS)?

________________________________
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List <IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU> on behalf of Timothy Sipples <***@SG.IBM.COM>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 2:03 AM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does Windows support NFS client?
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoops https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
[https://graspingtech.com/wp-content/uploads/windows-10-logo.jpg]<https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/>

How to Mount an NFS Share Using a Windows 10 Machine<https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/>
graspingtech.com
Mounting an NFS (Network File System) share using a Unix-like operating system is pretty straight forward. But how do you do this in Windows 10?



All supported desktop and server releases of Microsoft Windows include NFS
support. See here for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
instructions, for example:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx
Starting Client for NFS - technet.microsoft.com<https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx>
technet.microsoft.com
To start Client for NFS from the Windows interface Open Services for Network File System: click Start, point to Programs or All Programs, point to Administrative ...



macOS, IBM i, Linux, and all UNIX variants that I can think of also include
NFS support. It's quite a popular protocol, more popular than SMB/CIFS.
There's even a free NFS client for PC-DOS/MS-DOS/FreeDOS/DR-DOS operating
systems (would you believe):

http://freedos.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/NFS

It's probably past time to phase out the SMB protocol given recent
vulnerabilities and attacks such as WannaCry and ExPetr that affected
Windows systems. And if you decide to use file sharing of any sort, please
adopt and maintain security best practices if you haven't already.

Going forward, if you absolutely must have SMB protocol connectivity, then
"leapfrogging" is technically possible, I believe. The best leapfrogging
approach would be to configure Linux on Z such that z/OS connects via NFS
to Linux, thence Linux (using Samba) connects via SMB. In other words,
Linux on Z acts as a file/directory resharing gateway. I don't recommend
leapfrogging, but technically it should work. Variations are possible with
zdsfs instead of NFS for certain use cases.
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets
(e.g. PDSE to ISPF LM services)?
Yes, if I understand your "e.g." correctly. Here's the z/OS 2.2 NFS Guide
and Reference (direct link, subject to change) if you'd like the full
details:

http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/epubs/pdf/cpn2co11.pdf

To future readers: if this link is broken or not applicable (because you're
running a newer z/OS release for example), try searching for IBM
Publication SC23-6883 (latest revision), or check the z/OS part of the IBM
Knowledge Center.

--

This message and any attachments are intended only for the use of the addressee and may contain information that is privileged and confidential. If the reader of the message is not the intended recipient or an authorized representative of the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail and delete the message and any attachments from your system.

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Nims,Alva John , Al
2017-07-28 19:37:30 UTC
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It has been long time since I looked at this, but doesn't Samba have a z/OS server? I could be very wrong and could be a terrible implementation.

Al Nims
Systems Admin/Programmer 3
UFIT
University of Florida
(352) 273-1298

-----Original Message-----
From: IBM Mainframe Discussion List [mailto:IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU] On Behalf Of Timothy Sipples
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 4:04 AM
To: IBM-***@LISTSERV.UA.EDU
Subject: Re: z14 and z/OS 2.3 Blog Post
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does Windows support NFS client?
Yes, NFS client is built in to Windows 10 but you have to jump through
some hoops https://graspingtech.com/mount-nfs-share-windows-10/.
All supported desktop and server releases of Microsoft Windows include NFS support. See here for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 instructions, for example:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732891(v=ws.11).aspx

macOS, IBM i, Linux, and all UNIX variants that I can think of also include NFS support. It's quite a popular protocol, more popular than SMB/CIFS.
There's even a free NFS client for PC-DOS/MS-DOS/FreeDOS/DR-DOS operating systems (would you believe):

http://freedos.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/NFS

It's probably past time to phase out the SMB protocol given recent vulnerabilities and attacks such as WannaCry and ExPetr that affected Windows systems. And if you decide to use file sharing of any sort, please adopt and maintain security best practices if you haven't already.

Going forward, if you absolutely must have SMB protocol connectivity, then "leapfrogging" is technically possible, I believe. The best leapfrogging approach would be to configure Linux on Z such that z/OS connects via NFS to Linux, thence Linux (using Samba) connects via SMB. In other words, Linux on Z acts as a file/directory resharing gateway. I don't recommend leapfrogging, but technically it should work. Variations are possible with zdsfs instead of NFS for certain use cases.
Post by Paul Gilmartin
Does NFS seamlessly connect z/OS to z/OS Classic data sets (e.g. PDSE
to ISPF LM services)?
Yes, if I understand your "e.g." correctly. Here's the z/OS 2.2 NFS Guide and Reference (direct link, subject to change) if you'd like the full
details:

http://publibz.boulder.ibm.com/epubs/pdf/cpn2co11.pdf

To future readers: if this link is broken or not applicable (because you're running a newer z/OS release for example), try searching for IBM Publication SC23-6883 (latest revision), or check the z/OS part of the IBM Knowledge Center.

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Timothy Sipples
2017-07-29 02:02:40 UTC
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Post by David Crayford
I'm not sure about that for Windows desktop OSs. AFAIK it's only
recently been a feature of Windows 10 since Windows 10 Pro (Version
10.0.14393 and above) as mentioned in the blog.
Everyone is correct. :-)

Microsoft includes NFS ("Services for NFS") in Windows 7 Enterprise and
Ultimate. (I don't think Windows 8.x had an Ultimate flavor, so in the
Windows 8.x stream Microsoft's NFS is only in Windows 8 Enterprise.) All
that really changed in Windows 10 is that Microsoft included NFS in their
lower Windows 10 license tiers.

But no problem. Microsoft's NFS is based on the University of Michigan's
work. If you have Windows 7 but don't have Enterprise or Ultimate, you can
go right back to the original authors to get their NFS code (source code
and pre-built binary):

http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/windows/

UofM NFS also works on the now unsupported Windows Vista editions.

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Timothy Sipples
IT Architect Executive, Industry Solutions, IBM z Systems, AP/GCG/MEA
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David Crayford
2017-07-30 12:09:39 UTC
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Post by Timothy Sipples
Post by David Crayford
I'm not sure about that for Windows desktop OSs. AFAIK it's only
recently been a feature of Windows 10 since Windows 10 Pro (Version
10.0.14393 and above) as mentioned in the blog.
Everyone is correct. :-)
Regardless of the version of Windows it's a hell of a lot more difficult
to mount a NFS network drive compared to SMB.
Post by Timothy Sipples
Microsoft includes NFS ("Services for NFS") in Windows 7 Enterprise and
Ultimate. (I don't think Windows 8.x had an Ultimate flavor, so in the
Windows 8.x stream Microsoft's NFS is only in Windows 8 Enterprise.) All
that really changed in Windows 10 is that Microsoft included NFS in their
lower Windows 10 license tiers.
But no problem. Microsoft's NFS is based on the University of Michigan's
work. If you have Windows 7 but don't have Enterprise or Ultimate, you can
go right back to the original authors to get their NFS code (source code
http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/windows/
UofM NFS also works on the now unsupported Windows Vista editions.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Timothy Sipples
IT Architect Executive, Industry Solutions, IBM z Systems, AP/GCG/MEA
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John McKown
2017-07-31 15:15:21 UTC
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Post by David Crayford
Post by Timothy Sipples
Post by David Crayford
I'm not sure about that for Windows desktop OSs. AFAIK it's only
recently been a feature of Windows 10 since Windows 10 Pro (Version
10.0.14393 and above) as mentioned in the blog.
Everyone is correct. :-)
Regardless of the version of Windows it's a hell of a lot more difficult
to mount a NFS network drive compared to SMB.
​I'd bet that is because MS simply hasn't bothered to integrate NFS into
the basic portion of Windows, as opposed to SMB which is it's "native" way
to do disk sharing. And it's not just Windows, I've had my own ​fights
using NFS between z/OS 1.12 and Linux (Fedora). I can't talk to other
versions of z/OS because I don't really have access to a current version
upon which I can try NFS.
--
Veni, Vidi, VISA: I came, I saw, I did a little shopping.

Maranatha! <><
John McKown

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Clark Morris
2017-07-31 18:19:38 UTC
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[Default] On 31 Jul 2017 08:15:21 -0700, in bit.listserv.ibm-main
Post by David Crayford
Post by Timothy Sipples
Post by David Crayford
I'm not sure about that for Windows desktop OSs. AFAIK it's only
recently been a feature of Windows 10 since Windows 10 Pro (Version
10.0.14393 and above) as mentioned in the blog.
Everyone is correct. :-)
Regardless of the version of Windows it's a hell of a lot more difficult
to mount a NFS network drive compared to SMB.
?I'd bet that is because MS simply hasn't bothered to integrate NFS into
the basic portion of Windows, as opposed to SMB which is it's "native" way
to do disk sharing. And it's not just Windows, I've had my own ?fights
using NFS between z/OS 1.12 and Linux (Fedora). I can't talk to other
versions of z/OS because I don't really have access to a current version
upon which I can try NFS.
If your organization's operating system is unsupported and there is
any outside connection to it, I would be concerned about legal
liability if anything happens.

Clark Morris

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John McKown
2017-07-31 18:51:34 UTC
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​<SNIP>​
If your organization's operating system is unsupported and there is
any outside connection to it, I would be concerned about legal
liability if anything happens.
​There are _NO_ connections to z/OS even from internal boxes. When files
need to be transferred, they are written from z/OS to the appropriate,
internal, FTP server. This basically runs FTP ​software called "Beyond
FTP". When a file shows up in a particular directory, it is encrypted and
forwarded by that box to the appropriate external user, or just transferred
to the correct internal Windows "share". This is mainly to update internal
MS SQL databases. The reverse is done for external boxes - they ftp
encrypted files to this server, which decrypts it and forwards it to the
proper Windows share.
Clark Morris
--
Veni, Vidi, VISA: I came, I saw, I did a little shopping.

Maranatha! <><
John McKown

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Timothy Sipples
2017-07-29 06:49:51 UTC
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Post by Frank Swarbrick
What is the likelihood of Microsoft phasing out a protocol they
invented (SMB) in favor of one they id not (NFS)?
Barry Feigenbaum at IBM invented the original SMB protocol in 1983.
Post by Frank Swarbrick
It has been long time since I looked at this, but doesn't Samba
have a z/OS server?
There's a very old version (20 years old) available here:

https://download.samba.org/pub/samba/Binary_Packages/mvs/

Maybe somebody would like to try compiling the latest release on z/OS.

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Timothy Sipples
IT Architect Executive, Industry Solutions, IBM z Systems, AP/GCG/MEA
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Peter Relson
2017-07-29 21:46:59 UTC
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it seems the ESTAE got control before the FRR
wanna bet?

As the earlier posts mentioned, it is possible that an FRR will never get
control (for example if an SDWA could not be obtained, which typically
would happen only if the system was already in deep trouble). But an ESTAE
will never get control before an FRR (where such a statement implies that
both do get control). One might argue that if an FRR was skipped because
of inability to get an SDWA that the address space should be memterm'd
because the recovery routine would not have gotten a chance to clean up.
An FRR (also true for ESTAE) would also be skipped if the cross-memory
environment that it requires cannot be established.

I'd suggest that if you think this is happening, you get a dump and
examine the system trace, specifically for RCVY entries. A RCVY FRR entry
is provided whether the FRR is skipped or not, with an indication in the
data if it was skipped.

Peter Relson
z/OS Core Technologoy Design


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